However, postural distortions can result throughout the body if the Righting Reflex is obstructed.

Common causes of obstruction are:

  • the Rothbarts Foot, 
  • the PreClinical Clubfoot Deformity 
  • Cranial subluxations (e.g., occiput locked in extension)
  • Dental Malocclusions
  • Atlas Latency

In order to maintain postural homeostasis, the body is continuously compensating, keeping itself balanced over the feet and its head over the cervical spine with the eyes level to the horizon.  The following simple experiment demonstrates this automatic, subconscious postural reflex:

Stand up
Move your hip to one side


  • Your ribcage automatically tilts in the opposite direction 
  • Your neck automatically tilts in the same direction as your hip


This automatic reflex (tilt in posture) maintains your head over your cervical spine, your eyes level to the horizon and your weight over your feet.


Lovett (1905) described a coupling of motion between the Pelvis and Cranium (Levett Reactor), and between the vertebrae (Spìnal Coupling):


Spinal Coupling:


  • C1 should move in a similar direction as L5
  • C2 should move in a similar direction as L4
  • C3 should move in a similar direction as L3
  • C4 should move in the opposite direction as L2
  • C5 should move in the opposite direction as L1
  • This continues downward to T5 which moves in the opposite direction as T6


Pelvic-Cranial Coupling (Lovett Reactor)


  • Sacrum should move in the opposite direction as the occiput
  • The ilium should move in the oppositie direction to the ipsilateral (same side) temporal bone (e.g., an anteriorly rotated left ilium should automatically rotate the left temporal bone posteriorly)
  • The sacrum should move in the same direction as the sphenoid bone


In essence, the Lovett Reactor is a description of what occurs in the pelvis, vertebrae and cranial bones when the Righting Reflex is working correctly. 

Righting Reflex 

Reference:

Lovett RM. 1905 The Mechanism of the Normal Spine and Its Relation to Scoliosis. Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Vol CLIII, No 3.